Official Newsjournal of the Illinois Council of Health-System Pharmacists

ICHP KeePosted

November 2017

Volume 43 Issue 09

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KeePosted Info

Directly Speaking

Presidents Message

Features

Call for Nominations

2017 ICHP Annual Meeting

Nominate the Best!

ASHP Residency Design and Conduct Workshop

Columns

Government Affairs Report

Board of Pharmacy Update

New Practitioners Network

Educational Affairs

Leadership Profile

Professional Affairs - Best Practice Award Program

Professional Affairs

ICHPeople

College Connection

Midwestern University, Chicago College of Pharmacy

Roosevelt University College of Pharmacy

Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Sciences

More

Upcoming Events

Officers and Board of Directors

ICHP Pharmacy Action Fund (PAC) Contributors

Welcome New Members!

KeePosted Info



Illinois Council of Health-System Pharmacists
4055 North Perryville Road
Loves Park, IL 61111-8653
Phone: (815) 227-9292
Fax: (815) 227-9294
ichpnet.org

Ad Submission Information and Deadlines (here): http://www.ichpnet.org/resources/keeposted_submission.php 

KeePosted
Official Newsjournal of the Illinois Council of Health-System Pharmacists

EDITOR
Jacob Gettig

ASSISTANT EDITOR
Jennifer Phillips

MANAGING EDITOR
Scott Meyers

ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
Trish Wegner

DESIGN EDITOR
Leann Nelson

ICHP Staff
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Scott Meyers

VICE PRESIDENT - PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Trish Wegner

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS
Maggie Allen

INFORMATION SPECIALIST
Heidi Sunday

CUSTOMER SERVICE AND
PHARMACY TECH TOPICS™ SPECIALIST

Jo Ann Haley

ACCOUNTANTS
Jan Mark and Trisha Blassage

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER
Leann Nelson

LEGISLATIVE CONSULTANT
Jim Owen

ICHP Mission Statement
Advancing Excellence in Pharmacy

ICHP Vision Statement
ICHP dedicates itself to achieving a vision of pharmacy practice where:
  • Pharmacists are universally recognized as health care professionals and essential providers of health care services.
  • Patients are aware of the training, skills, and abilities of a pharmacist and the fundamental role that pharmacists play in optimizing medication therapy.
  • Formally educated, appropriately trained, and PTCB certified pharmacy technicians manage the medication distribution process with appropriate pharmacist oversight.
  • Pharmacists improve patient care and medication safety through the development of effective public policies by interacting and collaborating with patients, other health care professionals and their respective professional societies, government agencies, employers and other concerned parties.
  • Evidence-based practices are used to achieve safe and effective medication therapies.
  • There are an adequate number of qualified pharmacy leaders within the pharmacy profession.
  • Pharmacists take primary responsibility for educating pharmacy technicians, pharmacy students, pharmacist peers, other health professionals, and patients about appropriate medication use.

KeePosted Vision
As an integral publication of the Illinois Council of Health-System Pharmacists, the KeePosted newsjournal will reflect its mission and goals. In conjunction with those goals, KeePosted will provide timely information that meets the changing professional and personal needs of Illinois pharmacists and technicians, and maintain high publication standards.

KeePosted is an official publication of, and is copyrighted by, the Illinois Council of Health-System Pharmacists (ICHP). KeePosted is published 10 times a year. ICHP members received KeePosted as a member benefit. All articles published herein represent the opinions of the authors and do not reflect the policy of the ICHP or the authors’ institutions unless specified. Advertising inquiries can be directed to ICHP office at the address listed above. Image disclaimer: The image used in the Pharmacy Tech Topics™ advertisement is the property of © 2017 Thinkstock, a division of Getty Images. 

Ad Submission Information and Deadlines (here): http://www.ichpnet.org/resources/keeposted_submission.php 

Copyright © 2017, Illinois Council of Health-System Pharmacists. All rights reserved.

Directly Speaking
It's Summertime!

by Scott A. Meyers, Executive Vice President

At least by the time you read this it will be meteorological summer, which is June, July and August. Astronomical summer lags behind slightly beginning on June 21 this year or around this date every year. Regardless, as I write this in mid-May, the temperature outside is 46°F, and the rain clouds look like they could dump a couple of inches of snow on us at any time. But that’s weather in the Midwest. If you don’t like it, wait a half-hour, and it will change significantly.

But because summer is upon us, it’s time to do a little cleaning of the medicine cabinet. For me, summer means golf and with it, the need for sunscreen, acetaminophen and ibuprofen. So my first step is to check the expiration dates and inventory levels of my stock of all of them and make sure I’m prepared for the first of hopefully many outings.

With regard to sunscreen, I personally get a sunburn if I talk about golf, so I use the strongest stuff I can find. Even though the literature says that 30 SPF is all you need because anything higher doesn’t protect you any better or longer. Guess what? I don’t believe the literature plus knowing what the SPF number represents, I’m not going to be able to finish a round of 18 holes in the time 30 SPF gives me. You see, 30 SPF means that a thorough application will last 150 minutes in full sun. Well that’s 2.5 hours, and for those of you who don’t play golf, a round of 18 holes usually takes about 4 hours on a good day, 5½ to 6 hours at a 4-person scramble. So I use 70-100 SPF (they now make a 110 SPF, believe it or not) sunscreen and ride in a covered cart (if I’m not walking the course) and pray that the coverage lasts. Your needs may not be as serious as mine, but my recommendation is to always wear sunscreen if you plan on being out for more than 15 minutes in full sun. And if anyone can find a non-greasy, non-tacky sunscreen, please let me know. I’ve been looking for one since sunscreens became mainstream, and I’ve yet to find one. But sticky and slippery is better that red and in pain. And the permanent damage the sun can cause is even worse down the road.

After you’ve checked on your sunscreen and pain products, it’s probably a good idea to look through your first aid supplies. It seems like summertime brings more frequent needs for Band-Aids and antiseptic cream. Whether it’s cuts caused by weeding the flower beds or trimming the trees or burns from the barbeque grill, these items come in handy. There’s nothing worse than going to the medicine cabinet for a regular size Band-Aid only to find either 3 inch gauze pads or the Band-Aids you used to use to cover a zit in high school! Meet the need before you bleed!

A couple of chemical ice packs are probably worth keeping on hand, too. For the pulled muscle from that first practice round of golf, first long ride on the bike or the first attempt at getting out of the hammock in one quick, smooth move. There will be athletically related fails during the summer, and sprains and strains are part of the territory.

Don’t forget the potential for food poisoning increases in the summer as we leave the potato salad sitting out just a little too long or don’t handle the chicken properly and don’t quite grill it long enough. Loperamide (Imodium or generic equivalent) and bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto or generic equivalent) come in handy for the simple GI upset that occasionally surfaces. Hopefully you won’t see anything serious, but those two items are always good to have around at the beginning of the summer. Chances are they’re already in your medicine cabinet but again, check the dates and the quantities! You don’t want to run out of either in the middle of the night!

Finally, with summer comes mosquitos, poison ivy and other skin irritants that make the best time of the year in Illinois just a little more challenging. But no worries, a small tube of 1% hydrocortisone cream will help relieve any bites, stings or itches until you can get to the doctor if needed. At least our mosquitos don’t carry the Zika virus and aren’t the State bird like in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Or at least as far as we know, they don’t carry Zika yet. So don’t let the mosquitos or any of the other potential summertime maladies keep you indoors and out of the fun! Get out there and enjoy this summer…all three weeks of it, the way this year’s weather has been going! But first do a little spring cleaning to make your summertime medicine cabinet ready to go. Meet the need before you bleed, burn, itch, or whatever!


Presidents Message
Chicago State University College of Pharmacy Hooding Ceremony Address - GRIT

by Charlene Hope, PharmD, MS, BCPS, ICHP President

I had the honor of serving as the guest speaker at the Chicago State University College of Pharmacy Hooding Ceremony a few weeks ago. After several weeks of thinking about and hoping for a spark of a topic that would inspire a graduating class of student pharmacists, the word GRIT kept popping up in my head.

GRIT is defined as "perseverance and passion for long-term goals". Individuals with a high amount of this characteristic can maintain their determination and motivation over long periods despite experiences with failure and adversity. Their passion and commitment towards the long-term objective is the overriding factor that provides the stamina required to "stay the course" amid challenges and setbacks.

This personal characteristic of grit is often used to describe entrepreneurs and innovators or anyone really that is embarking on something new, different and perhaps against the norm. GRIT is the armor one needs if they are choosing to take the road less traveled.

Angela Lee Duckworth has popularized this term and recommends how we can build and develop GRIT over time.

The first stage is to foster a passion.

Part of grit is actually doing enough exploration early on and quitting enough things early on, so that you can find something with which you are willing to stick. You have to actively put some work in and try things – try them for a little while and get into them.

To me, fostering passion is to actively fight complacency like the plague. Whether one is a newly minted pharmacist or on the launching pad to retirement, it is so important to stay connected to the feelings that we had when we decided to pursue the profession of pharmacy. To stay connected to the feelings we had when we found out that we were accepted into pharmacy school. To stay connected to those feelings that we had on the first day of classes. Most importantly, to stay connected to how we felt the day we graduated, like many of the graduates that I spoke to that afternoon.

It is too easy to let the pressures of life take over and settle for a paycheck. To show up every day and punch a clock. Many of us, as members of ICHP engage our passion by being active members of ICHP.

The second stage is practice.

While we graduate equipped with the knowledge, skills and tools to do great things in our careers as pharmacists, we know that we are committing ourselves to a profession based on lifelong learning. It is so important, especially in our current era of rapid fire change – fueled by technology and innovation – to continue to hone our skills. However, I wanted to challenge the graduates and you, dear reader, to focus on doing all that you can to “practice” building relationships as well – that is, connecting your work to people who are not you. As pharmacists, we can become very insular and choose to remain in silos waiting for others to ask for our help, to invite us to be a part of a project impacting patient care or to direct us in how we choose to participate as a member of the healthcare team. Those often disrespected “soft skills” are the skills of the future. They are the interpersonal skills of leadership, charisma, diligence and contribution. These are skills that will really take you to the next level.

I am not sure why they are called soft skills, because it takes hard work to develop and hone these skills over time. But at the end of the day, they are at the heart of what we need today. Because even if you have a pharmacy degree, residency training and numerous letters behind your name, you are no help to us (patients, healthcare teams, society) without these human skills, the things that we cannot write down or program a computer to do.

And the final component is hope.

There has to be hope, that your vision for the future will come true.

“To be gritty is to keep putting one foot in front of the other. To be gritty is to hold fast to an interesting and purposeful goal. To be gritty is to invest, day after week after year, in challenging practice. To be gritty is to fall down seven times, and rise eight.” – Angela Lee Duckworth

I extend my wish to the CSU-COP Class of 2017, and to you my fellow ICHP members. I wish that you will rise more times than you fall as you continue your journey on the way to your dreams!

 

Features

Call for Nominations
Looking for a few good men! And women! How Would You Like To Run For An ICHP Office?

Feature Article

by Scott A. Meyers, Executive Vice President

Every year, ICHP elects new members to its Board of Directors. As existing officers complete their terms, they often move up to higher offices or move on for a variety of reasons not the least being that they’ve completed the highest offices of President-elect, President and Immediate Past President. So every year, the ICHP Committee on Nominations searches for new leaders to step up to carry on the business of the Council and who are dedicated to “Advancing Excellence in Pharmacy!” That’s ICHP’s mission by the way.

This year is no exception. With Jen Phillips completing her term as Immediate Past President and Carrie Vogler and Colleen Bohnenkamp completing their final terms as Director of Marketing Affairs and Chair of the New Practitioners Network, respectively, there are at least three offices that will need two candidates to run. In addition, Board Members Lara Ellinger and Clara Gary can run for another term for their respective offices and may or may not have yet committed. And even if they do decide to run again, the Committee on Nominations will be seeking a second candidate to fill the ballot completely.

Below is a list of the offices open for election in the fall of 2017. All of the elected candidates will take office at the 2018 Annual Meeting with the exception of the President-elect, who assumes office immediately. So each new leader will have almost a year to train for his/her new jobs and be coached by our current Board Members. You don’t have to run that race unprepared!

President-elect

Secretary-elect

Director-elect of the Division of Educational Affairs

Director-elect of the Division of Marketing Affairs

Technician Representative-elect

NPN Chair-elect


If you are interested in running for an office or you would like to know more about an office before committing to run, you may contact the Committee on Nominations Chair, Jen Phillips at jennifer.a.phillips@gmail.com or Scott Meyers at scottm@ichpnet.org. We hope you are ready to run for the lead of ICHP and Pharmacy!


 

2017 ICHP Annual Meeting
Register now for early bird rates!

Feature Article

ICHP 2017 Annual Meeting Annual Meeting - Register Now!

September 14-16, 2017
Drury Lane Theatre and Conference Center
100 Drury Lane
Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181

Registration
Early-bird registration ends August 22, 2017.

Schedule and Programming
View the Meeting-At-A-Glance (PDF) (tentative schedule).
View full meeting and programming details in the Web Brochure (PDF), updated 5-30-2017. 
All programming subject to change.

Meet Our Keynote Speakers:

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Michael A. Mone, BS Pharm, JD
VP Associate General Counsel, Regulatory
Cardinal Health
Dublin, OH
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Alex Adams, PharmD MPH
Executive Director
Idaho State Board of Pharmacy
Boise, ID
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Despina Kotis, PharmD, FASHP
Director of Pharmacy
Northwestern Memorial HealthCare
Chicago, IL
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Deborah Pasko, PharmD, MHA
Director of Medication Safety and Quality
American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
Bathesda, MD
BIO SLUG.jpg


ASHP Residency Program Design and Conduct Workshop (RPDC)
(Separate Registration Required)

New this year ICHP is providing the ASHP Residency Program Design and Conduct Workshop on Friday, September 15th at the Annual Meeting. ICHP is committed to expanding residency programs within the state and Midwest and is investing in hosting this workshop to help elevate practice and patient care. Members receive a special discounted registration to the workshop and an additional discount for attending both the workshop and the Annual Meeting. Register online or view and print the RPDC brochure for complete details. Seating is limited. Registration requested by August 14, 2017.


Exhibit Program
Thank you to all our exhibitors! Preview the companies in the Exhibit Hall this year. Be sure to stop by their booths to discover all the new products and services available.

Do you provide products or services essential for health-system pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, students and other related personnel? If so, you’ll want to take the lead at our Annual Meeting!
Complete the Exhibitor Registration Form online or view and print the Exhibitor Guide for complete details.

Residency Showcase
Students considering a residency program can preview the companies who will be at the Residency Showcase this year.

Showcase your residency program to students from pharmacy schools in Illinois. Many of these students will be completing their formal education within the year and will be considering residencies as a serious step in their career.
Complete the Residency Showcase Registration Form online or view and print the Residency Showcase brochure for complete details.

Hotel Accommodations
All meeting attendees are responsible for making their own hotel reservations. Special convention room rates, Single/Double $139; Triple $149; Quad $159, are available Wednesday, Sept.13 through Friday, Sept. 15, to Annual Meeting attendees at The Hilton Garden Inn in Oakbrook Terrace (1000 Drury Lane, Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181). These rates are available by calling The Hilton Garden Inn (1-877-STAYHGI) prior to August 22 and mentioning that you are attending ICHP’s Annual Meeting!

Nominate the Best!
ICHP Awards Process Opens

Feature Article

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It’s that time of year.  ICHP is looking for Illinois Pharmacy’s best and brightest!  The nominations process for the 2017 ICHP Pharmacist of the Year and Amy Lodolce Mentorship Award Recipients is open, and it’s your chance to recommend someone you know.  The process is different for both awards, so let’s start with ICHP’s highest honor, the Pharmacist of the Year.

Pharmacist of the Year Award

A Pharmacist of the Year nominee should meet the following criteria:

  • The nominee is a person of high moral character, good citizenship and high professional ideals; 
  • The nominee has made significant contributions affecting the practice of health-system pharmacy throughout the State; and
  • These contributions should be in the form of sustained exemplary service in health-system pharmacy or a single outstanding achievement, or a combination of accomplishments benefiting health-system pharmacy, through it, humanity and the public health.  These accomplishments, achievements, or outstanding performances may be in the following areas:

o   Health-system pharmacy practice

o   Health-system pharmacy education

o   Health-system pharmacy administration

o   Pharmaceutical research or development related to health-system pharmacy

o   Pharmacy organizational activity with a definite relationship to health-system pharmacy

o   Scientific or professional pharmacy writing, e.g., noteworthy articles on pharmaceutical subjects with applicability to health-system pharmacy

o   Pharmaceutical journalism related to health-system pharmacy

o   Public and/or inter-professional relations activities benefiting health-system pharmacy

o   Pharmacy law or legislation, professional regulations, standards of professional conduct or pharmacy law enforcement as related to health-system pharmacy.

 

Nominations may be received from Selection Committee members (past recipients of the award), past Presidents of the Council, affiliated chapters of the Council or any six pharmacist members of the Council submitting and signing a recommendation.  Nominators are encouraged to write a complete nomination letter and submit it to the ICHP office at scottm@ichpnet.org .  Nominations should include the name of the nominee and details describing how they meet the above criteria.  This year’s Selection Committee Chair is last year’s recipient, Carrie Sincak.  All nominations will be forwarded to the Selection Committee for review.

 

Amy Lodolce Mentorship Award

Amy Lodolce was a University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy faculty member who touched the lives of pharmacy students, residents, and colleagues through her passion for teaching and the profession of pharmacy. Throughout her time at the college, Amy oversaw the training of four PGY2 drug information pharmacy residents, all of whom are currently drug information faculty at various institutions. She worked directly with numerous PGY1 residents and APPE students during their drug information rotations. She also served as a formal mentor to her student advisees and was the advisor of the Phi Delta Chi pharmacy fraternity for many years. As the Assistant Director of the Drug Information Group, Amy served as an informal mentor to other faculty and was quick to help new faculty become oriented and situated.

 

Amy approached being a leader and a mentor with an “open door” policy, and she would selflessly pause her work to address others’ needs. Students, residents, and faculty alike would ask her for guidance with career decisions and other professional concerns. Amy was respectful and nonjudgmental in her approach when assisting others whose goals and aspirations may have been different from her own. Her dedication was exemplary in that she worked tirelessly to provide residents and students with quality learning opportunities. She led and coached by example, consciously choosing behaviors that she hoped students and residents would emulate. An active pharmacist member of ICHP, Amy placed emphasis on professional organization involvement and giving back to the profession. Amy’s dedication and generosity to the profession of pharmacy have positively shaped many pharmacists’ careers, and the memory of her will continue to do so.

 

Award Criteria:

  • The individual nominated to receive this award must be an ICHP pharmacist, associate or technician member in good standing;
  • The individual should be an exemplary preceptor, professor and/or mentor of students, residents, pharmacy technicians and/or new practitioners;
  • The individual should be a positive role model for pharmacists, pharmacy students and/or pharmacy technicians;
  •  In order to be considered for the award, individuals must have been nominated using the approved nomination form below;
  • More than one person may complete a nomination form for an individual.

To nominate someone for the Amy Lodolce Mentorship Award:

  1. Please provide your name(s), i.e., the name of the nominator(s). (More than one person can nominate a nominee).
  2. Provide the name of the person you are nominating. In addition, the nominee’s curriculum vitae must be included in the nomination package.
  3. Please answer the following questions about the nominee:

a.       Is the nominee a member of ICHP?

b.      In what capacity have you worked with the nominee?

c.       In what ways do you see the nominee working to advance the profession of pharmacy?

d.      Give some examples of ways in which this nominee is a model mentor/preceptor.

e.      Give some examples in which this nominee has demonstrated a service to community (outside of job responsibilities).

f.        How has this nominee impacted your career?

 

Completed nominations should be sent by July 1, 2017, to Scott Meyers at scottm@ichpnet.org or to the ICHP office by fax at 815-227-9294 or mail to 4055 N. Perryville Rd., Loves Park, IL 61111.

 

Also visit our  Award Nominations Webpage

Pharmacist of the Year

Make a Nomination

See Past Recipients

Technician of the Year Award

Make a Nomination

See Past Recipients

Amy Lodolce Mentorship Award

Make a Nomination

See Past Recipients

New Practitioner Leadership Award

Make a Nomination

See Past Recipients

Industry Award

Make a Nomination

See Past Recipients

 

ASHP Residency Design and Conduct Workshop
RPDC - Coming to the ICHP 2017 Annual Meeting!

Feature Article

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Are you starting a new PGY1 or PGY2 residency program?

Revising your existing PGY1 or PGY2 residency program?

Are you a new or existing preceptor? Or a new or existing residency program director? 


ICHP is bringing the RPDC to the Midwest during the 

ICHP 2017 Annual Meeting

Friday, September 15, 2017  |  8:00am to 5:30pm 

Oakbrook Terrace, IL


This workshop will apply to all types of new and existing residency programs, program directors, preceptors and residents. 

We will review accreditation standards for the design and conduct of a residency program, including requirements related to program purpose, competency areas, goals and objectives, program structure, learning experiences, orientation, use of preceptor roles, evaluation, resident development plans, and continuous residency program improvement. 

Participants may bring materials from their program for review during the workshop. 

Take advantage of the opportunity to have your questions answered and share ideas with your fellow participants.

All Illinois Residency Programs are welcome to have their residency directors, residents and preceptors attend at either a discounted member price (if a member of ICHP) or a non-member price. Residency program directors, residents and preceptors from outside Illinois may attend at the member price. 


The ICHP Residency Showcase will be held on Saturday, September 16th from 1 to 3pm.  So if you plan to have a booth at the Showcase, why not attend the RPDC the day before? 

Enjoy discounted Annual Meeting attendance for Thursday, September 14 and/or Saturday, September 16, 2017 in addition to the RPDC program on September 15th.  


Download Our Brochure or Register Online



Columns

Government Affairs Report

by Jim Owen and Scott Meyers


As you will see below, the list of bills we continue to monitor has grown much smaller and much more reasonable. There are still a few bad ones that we are hoping merely die on the vine (SB0642, SB0892, SB1607, SB2011, and HB2708) and a couple of reasonable ones we’re expecting to get passed (SB0902, SB1546, SB1790, SB1944, HB2957, and HB3462).

We mentioned last month that the Pharmacy Practice Act sunset bills were amended to provide a two-year renewal so that a Task Force could sit down and really go over the current Act to see where improvements in patient safety can be made. The Task Force will most likely begin work as soon as this spring’s legislative session is over. It will be an interesting process with a labor union at the table for the first time. We hope that reasonable compromises and accommodations can be made that do in fact, improve patient safety without creating burdensome statutes that are counterproductive to the advancement of pharmacist care and provider status for pharmacists. Only time will tell.

Oh, and in case you haven’t heard, the State is still far from a budget. Current discussions indicate that if one is not accepted by the end of session, we probably won’t get one until after the next election! In the meantime, the State burns as the General Assembly fiddles (around).

Below is a summary of currently active legislation (at the time of writing) and its status. We encourage you to talk to your legislators about these bills and health care in general over the summer and let them know you’re always available to provide input from folks in the field!

Bill Number

Sponsor

Summary

Location

ICHP Position

SB0009

Hutchinson – Chicago, D

Creates the Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax Act. Imposes a tax on distributors of bottled sugar-sweetened beverages, syrups, or powders at the rate of $0.01 per ounce of bottled sugar-sweetened beverages sold or offered for sale to a retailer for sale in the State to a consumer. Requires those distributors to obtain permits.

3rd Reading in Senate

 

SB0018

Cullerton  - Chicago, D

Technical change to the Alcoholism and Other Drug Abuse and Dependency Act.

3rd Reading in Senate

 

SB0073

HB0239

Silverstein – Chicago, D

Amends the Illinois Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. Adds provision concerning prescription drug price increases. Requires manufacturers of prescription drugs to notify State purchasers, health insurers, health care service plan providers, and pharmacy benefit managers of specified increases in drug prices at least 30 days before such increase and the cost of specified new prescription drugs 3 days before the commercial availability of a new drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or within 3 days after approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration if the new drug will be made commercially available within 3 days of such approval. Provides that within 30 days after such notifications, prescription drug manufacturers shall report specified information to the Department of Public Health and requires the Department to publish such information on its website. Provides that failure to report such information to specified entities shall result in a specified administrative penalty. Provides that the Department may adopt rules and issue guidance to implement these provisions and shall be responsible for enforcing these provisions. Contains provisions concerning the confidentiality of pricing information. Repeals provisions concerning prescription drug price increases on January 1, 2022. Effective immediately.

Human Services Comm.

 

SB0625

Martinez – Chicago, D

Amends the Regulatory Sunset Act. Extends the repeal of the Nurse Practice Act from January 1, 2018 to January 1, 2028. Amends the Nurse Practice Act. Defines "focused assessment", "full practice authority", "oversight", and "postgraduate advanced practice nurse". Changes references of "advanced practice nurse" and "APN" to "advanced practice registered nurse" and "APRN" throughout the Act. Replaces provisions regarding nursing delegation with provisions that prohibit specified actions. Provides other guidelines for delegation of nursing activities and medication administration. Makes changes to education program requirements, qualifications for licensure, the scope of practice, and continuing education for LPN and RN licensees. Provides that a written collaborative agreement is required for all postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses until specific requirements have been met. Provides that postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses may enter into written collaborative agreements with collaborating advanced practice registered nurses or physicians (rather than collaborating physicians or podiatric physicians). In provisions concerning prescriptive authority for postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses, sets forth the requirements for postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses to have prescriptive authority and the limitations of such authority. Makes changes to provisions concerning the grounds for disciplinary action under the Act. Requires the Department of Public Health to prepare a report regarding the moneys appropriated from the Nursing Dedicated and Professional Fund to the Department of Public Health for nursing scholarships. Makes other changes. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate

Neutral

SB0636

Link – Gurnee, D

Amends the Pharmacy Practice Act. Provides that the Act shall not apply to, or in any manner interfere with, the sale or distribution of dialysate, drugs, or devices necessary to perform home renal dialysis for patients with chronic kidney failure, provided that certain conditions are met. Effective immediately.

Health Care Licenses Committee in the House

 

SB0642

Steans – Steans, D

Amends the Nurse Practice Act. In provisions concerning scope of practice, written collaborative agreements, temporary practice with a collaborative agreement, prescriptive authority with a collaborative agreement, titles, advertising, continuing education, and reports relating to professional conduct and capacity, changes references of "advanced practice nurse" and "APN" to "advanced practice registered nurse" and "APRN". Provides that a written collaborative agreement is required for all postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses until specific requirements have been met. Provides that postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses may enter into written collaborative agreements with collaborating advanced practice registered nurses or physicians (rather than collaborating physicians or podiatric physicians). In provisions concerning prescriptive authority for postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses, sets forth the requirements for postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses to have prescriptive authority and the limitations of such authority. Defines "full practice authority" and provides requirements for it to be granted to an advanced practice registered nurse. Removes provisions concerning advanced practice nursing in hospitals, hospital affiliates, or ambulatory surgical treatment centers, except the provision for anesthesia services and the provision requiring advanced practice registered nurses to provide services in accordance with other Acts. Makes other changes. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate.

Oppose

SB0680

Althoff – McHenry, R

Amends the Safe Pharmaceutical Disposal Act. Provides that used, expired, or unwanted pharmaceuticals collected by a city, village, or municipality under the Act may be destroyed in a drug destruction device by a law enforcement agency. Amends the Environmental Protection Act. Expands the definition of "drug evidence" in the provision for drug destruction by a law enforcement agency to include any used, expired, or unwanted pharmaceuticals collected under the Safe Pharmaceutical Disposal Act.

Rules Committee in the House

 

SB0772

Martinez – Chicago, D

Amends the Regulatory Sunset Act by extending the repeal date of the Podiatric Medical Practice Act of 1987 from January 1, 2018 to January 1, 2028. Amends the Podiatric Medical Practice Act of 1987. Defines "email address of record" and "address of record". Provides that all applicants and licensees shall provide a valid address and email address, which shall serve as the address and email address of record, and shall inform the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation of any change of address or email address through specified means. Makes changes in provisions concerning the Podiatric Medical Licensing Board, grounds for disciplinary action, appointment of a hearing officer, and certification of records. Provides provisions concerning confidentiality of information collected by the Department in the course of an examination or investigation. Makes other changes. Effective immediately

Rules Comm. in the House

 

SB0892

Tracy – Quincy, R

Amends the Illinois Controlled Substances Act. Provides that the Department of Human Services may release information received by the central repository to select representatives of the Department of Children and Family Services through the indirect online request process. Provides that access shall be established by the Prescription Monitoring Program Advisory Committee by rule.

Rules Comm. in the House

 

SB0902

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Righter – Mattoon, R

Replaces everything after the enacting clause. Reinserts the introduced bill with the following changes: In provisions amending the Regulatory Sunset Act, provides that the repeal date of the Pharmacy Practice is extended to January 1, 2020 (rather than January 1, 2028). Further amends the Pharmacy Practice Act. Creates the Collaborative Pharmaceutical Task Force to discuss how to further advance the practice of pharmacy in a manner that recognizes the needs of specified interests. Provides for the voting and non-voting membership of the Task Force. Provides that the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation shall provide administrative support to the Task Force. Provides that the Task Force shall meet at least monthly. Provides that no later than September 1, 2019, voting members of the Task Force shall vote on recommendations concerning the certain standards. Provides that no later than November 1, 2019, the Department, in direct consultation with the Task Force, shall propose rules for adoption that are consistent with the Task Force's recommendations, or recommend legislation to the General Assembly, concerning the certain standards. Repeals provisions concerning the Task Force on November 1, 2020. Effective immediately.

Rules Committee in the House

 

SB1546 same as HB2957

Mulroe – Chicago, D

Amends the Illinois Insurance Code. Provides that every policy of accident and health insurance amended, delivered, issued, or renewed after the effective date of the amendatory Act that provides coverage for prescription drugs shall provide for synchronization of prescription drug refills on at least one occasion per insured per year provided that certain conditions are met. Requires insurers to provide prorated daily cost-sharing rates when necessary. Makes conforming changes in the State Employees Group Insurance Act of 1971, the Counties Code, the Illinois Municipal Code, the School Code, the Health Maintenance Organization Act, the Limited Health Services Organization Act, the Voluntary Health Services Plan Act, and the Illinois Public Aid Code. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate

 

SB1585

Martinez – Chicago, D

Amends the Regulatory Sunset Act. Extends the repeal date of the Physician Assistant Practice Act of 1987 from January 1, 2018 to January 1, 2028. Amends the Physician Assistant Practice Act of 1987. Reorganizes the Act by adding titles and renumbering provisions. Replaces references to "supervising physicians" with references to "collaborating physicians" throughout the Act. Replaces references to "supervision agreement" with references to "collaborative agreement" throughout the Act. Adds provisions concerning continuing education. In provisions concerning grounds for disciplinary action, provides that the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation may refuse to issue or renew a physician assistant license or discipline a licensee for willfully or negligently violating a patient's confidentiality, except as required by law, or failing to provide copies of medical records as required by law. Amends various Acts to conform references and terminology. Makes other changes. Effective immediately.

2nd Reading in the House

 

SB1607

Bush – Grayslake, D

Senate Amendment 1 - Replaces everything after the enacting clause. Amends the Illinois Controlled Substances Act. Before issuing a prescription for a Schedule II, III, IV, or V controlled substance, a prescriber or his or her designee shall access the prescription monitoring program to determine compliance with the pharmacy and medication shopping provisions of the Act. Provides that within one year of the effective date of the bill, the Department shall adopt rules requiring all Electronic Health Records Systems to interface with the Prescription Monitoring Program application program on or before January 1, 2021 to ensure that all providers have access to specific patient records during the treatment of their patients. These rules shall also address the electronic integration of pharmacy records with the Prescription Monitoring Program to allow for faster transmission of the information required under the Act. Provides that the Department shall establish actions to be taken if a prescriber's Electronic Health Records System does not effectively interface with the Prescription Monitoring Program within the required timeline. Provides that the Department of Human Services, in consultation with the Advisory Committee, shall adopt rules allowing licensed prescribers or pharmacists who have registered to access the Prescription Monitoring Program to authorize a designee to consult the Prescription Monitoring Program on their behalf. The rules shall include reasonable parameters concerning a practitioner's authority to authorize a designee, and the eligibility of a person to be selected as a designee.
Senate Floor Amendment No. 2
Restores language of the law that when a person has been identified as having 3 or more prescribers or 3 or more pharmacies, or both, that do not utilize a common electronic file for controlled substances within the course of a continuous 30-day period, the Prescription Monitoring Program may (rather than shall) issue an unsolicited report to the prescribers, dispensers, and their designees informing them of the potential medication shopping.

3rd Reading in the Senate.

 

 

 

 

SB1790

Stadelman – Rockford, D

Senate Floor Amendment No. 2
Replaces everything after the enacting clause. Amends the Pharmacy Practice Act. Provides that a pharmacist may exercise professional judgment to dispense an emergency supply of medication for a chronic disease or condition if the pharmacist is unable to obtain refill authorization from the prescriber when certain conditions are met. Provides that the emergency supply must be limited to the amount needed for the emergency period as determined by the pharmacist but the amount shall not exceed a 30-day supply. Effective immediately

3rd Reading in the House

Support as amended

SB1944

Nybo – Lombard, R

Senate Amendment 1 Replaces everything after the enacting clause. Amends the Hypodermic Syringes and Needles Act. Provides that a person who is at least 18 years of age may purchase from a pharmacy and have in his or her possession up to 100 (rather than 20) hypodermic syringes or needles. Provides that a pharmacist may sell up to 100 (rather than 20) sterile hypodermic syringes or needles to a person who is at least 18 years of age. Provides that a prescriber (rather than a licensed physician) may direct a patient under his or her immediate charge to have in possession any of the hypodermic syringes and needles permitted by the Act. Deletes provision that the Illinois Department of Public Health must develop educational materials and make copies of the educational materials available to pharmacists. Deletes provision that pharmacists must make these educational materials available to persons who purchase syringes and needles as authorized under the Act. Permits an electronic order for the hypodermic syringes and needles. Defines "prescriber".

Rules Comm. in the House

Support as amended

SB2011

Bivins – Dixon, R

Amends the Illinois Controlled Substances Act. Provides that a registered pharmacist filling a prescription for an opioid substance listed in Schedule II may dispense the prescribed substance in a lesser quantity than the recommended full quantity indicated on the prescription if requested by the patient provided that the prescription complies with the requirements of the Act. Provides that the remaining quantity in excess of the quantity requested by the patient shall be void. Provides that if the dispensed quantity is less than the recommended full quantity, the pharmacist or his or her designee shall, within a reasonable time following a reduction in quantity but not more than 7 days, notify the prescribing practitioner of the quantity actually dispensed. Provides that nothing in this provision shall be interpreted to conflict with or supersede any other requirement established in the Act for a prescription of an opiate substance or any requirements or conditions for drug substitutions established in the Act. Effective immediately.

Senate Amendment 1 - Provides that when issuing a prescription for an opiate to a patient 18 years of age or older for outpatient use for the first time, a practitioner may not issue a prescription for more than a 7-day supply. A practitioner may not issue an opiate prescription to a person under 18 years of age for more than a 7-day supply at any time and shall discuss with the parent or guardian of the person under 18 years of age the risks associated with opiate use and the reasons why the prescription is necessary. Provides that notwithstanding this provision, if, in the professional medical judgment of a practitioner, more than a 7-day supply of an opiate is required to treat the patient's acute medical condition or is necessary for the treatment of chronic pain management, pain associated with a cancer diagnoses, or for palliative care, then the practitioner may issue a prescription for the quantity needed to treat that acute medical condition, chronic pain, pain associated with a cancer diagnosis, or pain experienced while the patient is in palliative care. Provides that the condition triggering the prescription of an opiate for more than a 7-day supply shall be documented in the patient's medical record and the practitioner shall indicate that a non-opiate alternative was not appropriate to address the medical condition. Provides that these provisions do not apply to medications designed for the treatment of substance abuse or opioid dependence.

3rd Reading in the Senate

Oppose

HR0016

Gordon-Booth – Peoria, D

Urges Congress to pass legislation in support of the establishment of VA emergency prescription refill programs nationwide to ensure that, in emergency situations, veterans may receive medication directly from their local pharmacy and VA facility.

Place on Calendar Order of Resolutions.

 

HR0030

Welch – Westchester, D

Designates October 2017 as "Zombie Preparedness Month" in the State of Illinois, and urges all Illinoisans to educate themselves about natural disasters and take steps to create a stockpile of food, water, and other emergency supplies that can last up to 72 hours.

Resolution Adopted.

 

HR0059

Cassidy – Chicago, D

Recognizes the importance of improving awareness of self-care and the value it represents to the citizens of Illinois. Supports increased consumer empowerment through the development of new nonprescription medicines and the appropriate switch of certain prescription medicines to nonprescription. Acknowledges that over-the-counter medicines can greatly improve and reduce costs to the public health system. Encourages consumers, healthcare practitioners, policymakers and regulators to communicate the benefits of self-care. Recognizes February of 2017 as Self-Care Month in Illinois.

Place on Calendar Order of Resolutions

 

HR0088

Flowers – Chicago, D

Urges the federal government to monitor the ever-increasing costs of prescription drugs and to take any necessary action to reduce the out-of-pocket expenses for those purchasing medications.

Resolution Adopted

 

HR0116

McSweeney – Cary, R

Declares opposition to raising the sales taxes on food and drugs.

Revenue and Finance Comm. Sales and Other Taxes Subcomm.

 

HB0313

Feigenholtz – Chicago, D

Amends the Regulatory Sunset Act. Extends the repeal of the Nurse Practice Act from January 1, 2018 to January 1, 2028. Amends the Nurse Practice Act. Defines "focused assessment", "full practice authority", "oversight", and "postgraduate advanced practice nurse". Changes references of "advanced practice nurse" and "APN" to "advanced practice registered nurse" and "APRN" throughout the Act. Replaces provisions regarding nursing delegation with provisions that prohibit specified actions. Provides other guidelines for delegation of nursing activities and medication administration. Makes changes to education program requirements, qualifications for licensure, the scope of practice, and continuing education for LPN and RN licensees. Provides that a written collaborative agreement is required for all postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses until specific requirements have been met. Provides that postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses may enter into written collaborative agreements with collaborating advanced practice registered nurses or physicians (rather than collaborating physicians or podiatric physicians). In provisions concerning prescriptive authority for postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses, sets forth the requirements for postgraduate advanced practice registered nurses to have prescriptive authority and the limitations of such authority. Makes changes to provisions concerning the grounds for disciplinary action under the Act. Requires the Department of Public Health to prepare a report regarding the moneys appropriated from the Nursing Dedicated and Professional Fund to the Department of Public Health for nursing scholarships. Makes other changes. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate

Neutral as amended

HB0524

Wheeler – Crystal Lake, R

Amends the Safe Pharmaceutical Disposal Act. Provides that pharmaceuticals disposed of under the Act may be destroyed in a drug destruction device. Amends the Environmental Protection Act. Expands the definition of "drug evidence" to include any used, expired, or unwanted pharmaceuticals collected under the Safe Pharmaceutical Disposal Act. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate

 

HB0706

Bellock – Westmont, R

Amends the Safe Pharmaceutical Disposal Act. Provides that in the absence of a police officer, State Police officer, coroner, or medical examiner at the scene of a death, a nurse or physician may dispose of unused medication found at the scene while engaging in the performance of his or her duties. Provides that anyone authorized to dispose of unused medications under the Act, and his or her employer, employees, or agents shall incur no civil liability, criminal liability, or professional discipline, except for willful or wanton misconduct, as a result of any injury arising from his or her good faith disposal or non-disposal of unused medication. Defines "nurse" and "physician". Amends the Medical Practice Act of 1987 and the Nurse Practice Act to make conforming changes. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate

 

HB2531

Hammond – Macomb, R

Amends the Illinois Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. Deletes provisions requiring manufacturers to provide the Director of Public Health with a notification containing product technical bioequivalence information no later than 60 days prior to specified generic drug product substitution. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate

 

HB2534

Bourne – Litchfield, R

Amends the Illinois Controlled Substances Act. Requires that to be illegal a drug analog must not be approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration or, if approved, it is not dispensed or possessed in accordance with State and federal law. Defines "controlled substance" to include a synthetic drug enumerated as a scheduled drug under the Act. Adds chemical structural classes of synthetic cannabinoids and piperazines to the list of Schedule I controlled substances. Includes certain substances approved by the FDA which are not dispensed or possessed in accordance with State or federal law and certain modified substances.

2nd Reading in the Senate

 

HB2708

Demmer – Rochelle, R

Amends the Illinois Controlled Substances Act. Provides that the Department of Human Services may release information received by the central repository to select representatives of the Department of Children and Family Services through the indirect online request process. Provides that access shall be established by the Prescription Monitoring Program Advisory Committee by rule.

3rd Reading in the Senate

 

HB2957 same as SB1546

Fine – Glenview, D

Amends the Illinois Insurance Code. Provides that every policy of accident and health insurance amended, delivered, issued, or renewed after the effective date of the amendatory Act that provides coverage for prescription drugs shall provide for synchronization of prescription drug refills on at least one occasion per insured per year provided that certain conditions are met. Requires insurers to provide prorated daily cost-sharing rates when necessary. Makes conforming changes in the State Employees Group Insurance Act of 1971, the Counties Code, the Illinois Municipal Code, the School Code, the Health Maintenance Organization Act, the Limited Health Services Organization Act, the Voluntary Health Services Plan Act, and the Illinois Public Aid Code. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate

 

HB3462

Zalewski – Riverside, D

Amends the Regulatory Sunset Act. Extends the repeal date of the Pharmacy Practice Act from January 1, 2018 to January 1, 2028. Amends the Pharmacy Practice Act. Provides that all applicants and licensees shall provide a valid address and email address, which shall serve as the address and email address of record, and shall inform the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation of any change of address or email address through specified means. Provides for the licensure (rather than registration) of registered pharmacy technicians, registered certified pharmacy technicians, and pharmacists, and makes conforming changes. Removes provision allowing each member of the State Board of Pharmacy to receive a per diem payment in an amount determined from time to time by the Secretary of Financial and Professional Regulation for attendance at meetings of the Board and conducting other official business of the Board. Changes references to "Director" to references to "Secretary" or "Department" throughout the Act. Eliminates the position of deputy pharmacy coordinator. Makes changes in provisions concerning definitions, duties of the Department, inactive status, pharmacists in charge, nonresident pharmacy licenses, record retention, automated pharmacy systems, remote prescription processing, and discipline. Makes other changes. Effective immediately.

3rd Reading in the Senate

Support as amended

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support strongly

 

 

 

 

Monitor closely

 

 

 

 

Oppose strongly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Board of Pharmacy Update
Highlights of the May Meeting

by Scott A. Meyers, Executive Vice President

The May 9th Board of Pharmacy Meeting was held at the James R. Thompson Center in downtown Chicago. These are the highlights of that meeting.

Affiliated Monitors – The Board continued a discussion with a representative of Affiliated Monitors an independent monitoring contractor and pre-approved their services for future pharmacy disciplinary cases that require the services of an independent monitor. The Board agreed that the individual monitor contracted by Affiliated Monitors would need to be vetted by the Board. The Board also agreed that other interested independent monitoring agencies could come before them to receive pre-approval in a likewise manner.

Pharmacy Practice Act Sunset – Board Counsels Alex Cooper and Katy Straub reported to the Board that the Pharmacy Practice Act Sunset bills (one in the House and one in the Senate) were moving forward with a two year extension to the Act. An amendment to these bills creates a Task Force to look at electronic prescribing in depth and also workload issues that impact public safety. One of the bills is expected to pass and to be signed by the Governor.

NABP Annual Meeting – The Annual Meeting of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy is taking place in late May in Orlando, and Board Chair Yash Patel will represent the Board as its delegate. Several Board members will be in attendance and will present a tabletop display of the proceedings of last fall’s District IV meeting that was held in Chicago. Board member Al Carter will be a presenter at the meeting, and Board member Phil Burgess is running for re-election to NABP’s Executive Committee.

Legislative Update – At each Board of Pharmacy meeting, ICHP or IPhA staff provide a summary of pharmacy-related legislation before the General Assembly. At this meeting a 22-page document was summarized by yours truly. While ICHP had over 80 bills and resolutions that it was monitoring, about a dozen of these bills were discussed. A full report of bills that are still active with the General Assembly can be found in the Government Affairs Report in this issue of KeePosted.

Next Board of Pharmacy Meeting – The next meeting of the Illinois Board of Pharmacy will be held at 10:30 AM on Tuesday July 11th at the James R. Thompson Center in downtown Chicago. Announcements and agendas are posted at least 14 days in advance on the IDFPR pharmacy website. The profession is welcome to attend the open portion of this meeting.



 

New Practitioners Network
Volunteering at Ronald McDonald House Meals from the Heart

by Florence Garza, P3, SSHP President, Chicago State University College of Pharmacy

  

Ronald McDonald House Charities in Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana is a non-profit organization that has been serving the community for 40 years. They serve families whose children are sick and in the hospital getting the care they need. The organization assists in free housing that is near each family’s hospitalized child, allowing them to stay close to their loved ones.

April 15th was the first time I had volunteered at a Ronald McDonald House, which was located near Loyola University Hospital in Hines, Illinois. There were five student volunteers from Chicago State University and Midwestern University along with two practicing pharmacists from Midwestern University/Northwestern Medicine and the University of Chicago Medicine. A variety of brunch items were prepared for the families, which included eggs, pancakes, bacon, sausage, yogurt, fruit, bagels and cream cheese, and croissants and pastries. After cooking and preparing the meal, we served it buffet style for the guests staying at the house. As guests proceeded to the kitchen, each one of them thanked us for a home cooked meal during their busy stay.

Once breakfast was served, the volunteers were given a tour of the house and it was quite incredible. The set up of the home had both purpose and meaning. The house had 18 bedrooms, and each of these bedrooms had either a queen-sized bed or two twin beds with nightstands and a closet. None of the bedrooms had a television in them because the organization believes televisions should be located in the shared family rooms. The house had two family rooms, each equipped with a television, DVD player, and gaming consoles. The living room had a cabinet filled with toys, games, puzzles and stuffed animals. Everything in the closet was donated for the children to play with and use during their stay. There was a kid’s playroom on the main floor where the children could play. On the third floor, guests were able to use the beautiful chapel, which had stained glass windows signifying and supporting different religions. The top floor of the home had a computer lab that was created by an eagle scout. Lastly, we were shown the library which was filled with books for children and adults. It even contained a hidden indoor tree house with beanbags for children to sit on and read their favorite children’s book.

Trying to find time to volunteer with a busy pharmacy school lifestyle can seem a bit overwhelming. However, it was an eye-opening and rewarding experience. Contributing to the community by volunteering to prepare and serve these wonderful families with a home cooked meal gives you a sense of purpose and self-worth. Knowing that I could potentially have a positive impact on someone was rewarding. I would recommend taking just a couple of hours from your free time to volunteer for such a great cause. These families are staying at the house while their children are getting the necessary medical attention they need. Preparing a meal for families during a time of stress is a great way to show support to these families during their difficult time. The guests are beyond grateful to those who have donated house items, toys, books, or their time.


ICHP volunteers: Huma Nizamuddin, Florence Garza, Milena McLaughlin, Bernice Man, Robert Korthals, Sara Lindquist, and Adam Wahab.


Educational Affairs
Loperamide: An Old Drug with Rising Concern

by Ashley J Weber, PharmD(1); Edwin S Lim, PharmD(2,3); Anthony Burda, RPh, DABAT(4); Carol DesLauriers, PharmD, DABAT(4)

Authors: Ashley J Weber, PharmD1; Edwin S Lim, PharmD2,3; Anthony Burda, RPh, DABAT4; Carol DesLauriers, PharmD, DABAT4

1SwedishAmerican Hospital, Rockford, IL; 2Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, College of Pharmacy, North Chicago, IL; 3Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL; 4Illinois Poison Center, Chicago, IL


Introduction:

Loperamide (Imodium®) is a synthetic opioid antidiarrheal medication that has been widely available over-the-counter since the 1980s.1 Its chemical structure is similar to opioid analgesics. The prescribing information for loperamide states an “extremely low abuse potential,” which may contribute to a misconception about its safety, even at supratherapeutic doses.2 At recommended doses, loperamide inhibits peristaltic activity in the large intestine. However, at supratherapeutic doses, loperamide is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and provide the euphoric effects commonly sought after in opioid abuse.1 Loperamide has become known as a “poor man’s methadone” and is used both recreationally to achieve the same euphoric effect common to opioids and to avoid drug withdrawal. Recent evidence from the National Poison Data System has shown an increasing trend in intentional loperamide overdoses, leading to rising concerns over its opioid toxidrome and other serious toxicities such as life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias and death.1,3-8  

 

Pharmacology:

Loperamide acts as a mu-receptor agonist, which decreases peristaltic activity. The recommended dose is 4 mg orally after the first loose stool and then 2 mg after each additional loose stool, not to exceed 16 mg per day, per the package insert.Despite its opioid properties, it was once believed to have limited abuse potential due to its poor central nervous system (CNS) penetration. Loperamide is a known substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which limits its penetration into body tissues, particularly the CNS.7 This exerts a protective mechanism by minimizing drug concentrations. It is also a substrate through the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 pathways.3 Concomitant ingestion with CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g. statins, -azoles, cimetidine, grapefruit juice), CYP2D6 inhibitors (e.g. SSRIs) or P-gp inhibitors (e.g. methadone, verapamil, quinidine) could prevent metabolism, facilitate increased serum concentrations and increase CNS absorption of loperamide.7,9 Loperamide has been reported to produce QTc prolongation and may also cause QRS widening, leading to ventricular tachycardia.10-13 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also released a statement warning against the use of approved doses due to misuse or abuse because of this adverse effect.14 Notably, documented cases of QTc prolongation and other cardiac disturbances were in patients who had no previous cardiac history and were not on other QTc prolonging agents.10-13

 

Illinois Poison Center Data:

The Illinois Poison Center (IPC) managed 137 total loperamide exposures from 2014-2016. Of these, 18 patients overdosed for the purpose of abuse, withdrawal prevention, or treatment. Characteristics of these loperamide exposures include:

●     Patients ranged from 18-60 years of age, with a mean age of 31 years.

●     Loperamide doses ranged from 36 mg once to 400 mg per day for six years.

●     11 cases resulted in hospital admission.

○     Five of these cases required critical care unit admission.

○     No cases resulted in fatality.

●     Three cases included respiratory symptom response with naloxone administration. However, these patients still required critical care unit admissions.

●     Nine cases reported cardiac abnormalities.

○     Six of those cases reported EKG changes, including QRS widening, QTc prolongation, ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac arrest.

■     One patient presented with a QRS interval of 112 ms and a QTc interval of 726 ms.

■     Another patient presented with a QRS interval of 146 ms and a QTc interval of 526 ms.


Management:

  • Patients should be monitored for CNS and respiratory depression.

  • Laboratory evaluation requires monitoring of serum electrolytes, including potassium, calcium and magnesium.

  • Vital signs, pulse oximetry and EKGs should be assessed. Continuous cardiac monitoring is recommended.

Treatment:

  • If the patient is awake and alert, has a protected airway and has ingested loperamide within one to two hours prior to emergency department (ED) presentation, consider giving activated charcoal.

  • There is no evidence for the use of dialysis, hemoperfusion or urinary alkalinization to increase the elimination of loperamide from the body. Loperamide is highly protein bound (97%).

  • To reverse respiratory depression, the patient should be given 0.4 mg of naloxone with repeat dosing as needed. Titrate carefully to prevent intubation but not cause opioid withdrawal in patients with chronic abuse. It is critical to note that naloxone may correct CNS and respiratory depression; however, it will not correct cardiac toxicity.

  • Supportive care for cardiotoxicity/arrhythmias:

○     QRS widening: Bolus doses of IV sodium bicarbonate (50-100 mEq) to alkalinize arterial pH to 7.45-7.55 if the QRS complex is wide.

○     QTc Prolongation: Because hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia may contribute to a widened QTc interval, the following are recommended:

■     Magnesium Sulfate IV 1-2 grams to maintain magnesium > 2 mg/dL. Additionally, magnesium sulfate is the first-line choice if the patient develops torsades de pointes.

■     Potassium Chloride IV 20-40 mEq to maintain potassium > 4 mEq/L.

■     Calcium Chloride IV 1 gram over two to five minutes; repeat as needed.

○     In refractory cases, transvenous/transcutaneous pacing has been used.

○     Defibrillation.


Discussion:

Loperamide’s widespread availability, low cost and large package sizes may contribute to misuse of this over-the-counter product.7 For example, one big box retailer offers 400 caplets for the price of $7.59. With increasing incidence of loperamide overdoses, healthcare professionals should be aware of loperamide’s abuse potential, especially in patients who have a significant history of narcotic use or methadone maintenance therapy. 

 

The potential for loperamide abuse should be considered when evaluating patients with a history of substance abuse who present to the ED with a drug overdose. However, screening for use could be difficult, as routine drug screens do not detect synthetic opioids.15

 

For immediate assistance in managing known or suspected overdose, pharmacists can call the IPC at 800-222-1222.

 

References:

1.Vakkalanka JP, Charlton NP, Holstege CP. Epidemiologic trends in loperamide abuse and misuse. Ann Emerg Med. 2017;69(1):73-78.

2. IMODIUM – loperamide hydrochloride capsule. Available at: https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?id=6651. Accessed January 23, 2017.

3. Dierksen J, Gonsoulin M, Walterscheid JP. Poor man's methadone: a case report of loperamide toxicity. Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2015;36(4):268-70.

4. Marraffa JM, Holland MG, Sullivan RW, et al. Cardiac conduction disturbance after loperamide abuse. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2014;52(9):952-7.

5. Lasoff DR, Koh CH, Corbett B, Minns AB, Cantrell FL. Loperamide trends in abuse and misuse over 13 years: 2002-2015. Pharmacotherapy. 2016.

6. Upadhyay A, Bodar V, Malekzadegan M, et al. Loperamide induced life threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Case Rep Cardiol. 2016;2016:5040176.

7. Eggleston W, Clark KH, Marraffa JM. Loperamide abuse associated with cardiac dysrhythmia and death. Ann Emerg Med. 2017;69(1):83-86.

8.Bishop-freeman SC, Feaster MS, Beal J, et al. Loperamide related deaths in North Carolina. J Anal Toxicol. 2016;40(8):677-686.

9. Kim KA, Chung J, Jung DH, Park JY. Identification of cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the metabolism of loperamide in human liver microsomes. Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004; 60:575–581.

10. Wightman RS, Hoffman RS, Howland MA, Rice B, Biary R, Lugassy D. Not your regular high: cardiac dysrhythmias caused by loperamide. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2016;54(5):454-8.

11. Kozak PM, Harris AK, Mcpherson JA, Roden DM. Torsades de pointes with high-dose loperamide. J Electrocardiol. 2017, pii:S0022-0736(17):30014-6.

12. Eggleston W, Marraffa JM, Stork CM, et al. notes from the field: cardiac dysrhythmias after loperamide abuse — New York, 2008–2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65(45):1276–1277.

13. Upadhyay A, Bodar V, Malekzadegan M, et al. Loperamide induced life threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Case Rep Cardiol. 2016;2016:5040176.

14. FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA warns about serious heart problems with high doses of the antidiarrheal medicine loperamide (Imodium), including from abuse and misuse. Available at: https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm504617.htm. Accessed April 12, 2017.

15. Stanciu CN, Gnanasegaram SA. Loperamide, the "poor man's methadone": brief review. J Psychoactive Drugs. 2017; 49(1):18-21.

 

Leadership Profile
Katelyn Conklen, PharmD


What is your current leadership position in ICHP?

Sangamiss Society President and a new member of the ICHP Marketing Affairs Division

 

What benefits do you see in being active in a professional association such as ICHP?  What initially motivated you to get involved in ICHP?

I always knew I wanted to get more involved with a professional organization.  After moving to Springfield, IL and participating in Sangamiss Society continuing education (CE) programs, I found that ICHP is a large organization within the pharmacy community, and it had a lot to offer a new practitioner. 

 

The top 5 reasons why I am active in ICHP are to:

1.            Strengthen my career through CE opportunities

2.            Network with others at ICHP meetings and events

3.            Advocate for my profession on health care legislation and regulation

4.            Reach out to my community through community service

5.            Develop my leadership skills through volunteer leadership positions

 

Where did you go to pharmacy school?

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

 

Where have you trained or worked?

I completed a PGY-1 residency program at St. Louis Veteran Affairs Health Care System, and I am currently employed at Memorial Medical Center as a Critical Care Pharmacist.

 

Describe your current area of practice and practice setting.

I am a clinical pharmacist in the SICU at Memorial Medical Center in Springfield, IL.  I complete daily rounds with the Trauma and Neurocritical Care team. On the SICU unit, I provide support for the staff including verifying orders, answering nurse and physician questions, and participating in codes.

 

Is there an individual you admire or look up to or a mentor that has influenced your career?

Zachary Stacy, Associate Professor at St. Louis College of Pharmacy, was a mentor to me as a student and a resident. He helped me find my passion for clinical pharmacy and helped me get more involved in professional organizations.

 

What advice would you give to student pharmacists?

Get involved!  Getting involved allows you to network, discover your interests, reach out to the community, advance patient care, and strengthen your future career.

 

What pharmacy related issues keep you up at night?

•             The treatment of elevated intracranial pressure in traumatic brain injury
•             Blood pressure management in stroke patients
•             Vasospasm treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

 

Do you have any special interests or hobbies outside of work?

Hunting, fishing, traveling, running, and spending time with my family

 

Do you have a favorite restaurant or food?

Magic Kitchen - Thai Food

 

What is your favorite place to vacation?

Cedar Rapids Lodge in Black Duck, Minnesota.  It’s a great place to fish, boat, and spend time with family. My parents have been traveling there since they were young kids, and now it’s a tradition for our family and friends to travel there every year.

 

What is the most interesting/unique fact about yourself that few people know?

I am a big hunter and outdoors-woman.

 

What 3 adjectives would people use to best describe you?

Outgoing, hardworking, educator

 

Professional Affairs - Best Practice Award Program
Last Chance! Submit Your Entry Now!





The objective of the Best Practice Award program is to encourage the development of innovative or creative pharmacy practice programs or innovative approaches to existing pharmacy practice challenges in health systems within the state of Illinois.

Applicants will be judged on their descriptions of programs and practices employed in their health system based on the following criteria:
  • Innovativeness / originality
  • Contribution to improving patient care
  • Contribution to institution and pharmacy practice
  • Scope of project
  • Quality of submission
Applicants must be ICHP members for a minimum of 90 days prior to submission. If you have any questions related to the program please contact Trish Wegner at trishw@ichpnet.org.

Previous Winners

2016
Maya Beganovic, PharmD and Sarah M. Wieczorkiewicz, PharmD, BCPS
"MALDI-TOF alone versus MALDI-TOF combined with real-time antimicrobial stewardship interventions on time to optimal therapy in patients with positive blood cultures"

2015
Kuntal Patel, Pharm.D., Pavel Prusakov, and Heather Vaule
“Osteopenia of Prematurity (aka Better Bones for Babies)”

2014
Arti Phatak, Pharm.D.; Brooke Ward, Pharm.D., BCPS; Rachael Prusi, Pharm.D.; Elizabeth Vetter, Pharm.D.; Michael Postelnick, BS Pharm, BCPS (AQ Infectious Diseases); and Noelle Chapman, Pharm.D., BCPS
“Impact of Pharmacist Involvement in the Transitional Care of High-Risk Patients through Medication Reconciliation, Medication Education, and Post-Discharge Callbacks”

2013
Nicole Rabs, Pharm.D., Sarah M. Wieczorkiewicz, Pharm.D., BCPS, Michael Costello, PhD, and Ina Zamfirova, BA
“Development of a Urinary-Specific Antibiogram for Gram Negative Isolates: Impact of Patient Risk Factors on Susceptibility”


Online entry form: Click (here) or paste the link below in your browser.
http://ichpnet.org/pharmacy_practice/professional_practice/best_practices/application_form/ 
Submission deadline: July 1, 2017

Eligibility
Applicants must be a member of ICHP practicing in a health system setting. More than one program can be submitted by a health system for consideration. Past submissions may be re-submitted if not previously given the award. Any new data should be included.

Instructions for preparing manuscript
Each entry for the Best Practice Award must include a manuscript prepared as a Word document, double-spaced using Times New Roman 12-pitch type. A header with the paper title and page number should appear on each page. The manuscript should not exceed 2000 words in length (not counting references), plus no more than a total of 6 supplemental graphics (tables, graphs, pictures, etc.) that are relevant to the program. Each picture, graph, figure, and table should be mentioned in the text and prepared as a separate document clearly labeled.

The manuscript should be organized as a descriptive report using the following headings:
  • Introduction, Purpose, and Goals of the program
  • Description of the program
  • Experience with and outcomes of the program
  • Discussion of innovative aspects of programs and achievement of goals
  • Conclusion
Format
Submissions will only be accepted via online submission form. The manuscript will be forwarded to a pre-defined set of reviewers. Please do not include the names of the authors or affiliations in the manuscript to preserve anonymity.

All applicants will be notified of their status within three weeks of the submission deadline. Should your program be chosen as the winner:
  • The program will be featured at the ICHP Annual Meeting. You will need to prepare a poster to present your program and/or give a verbal presentation. Guidelines will be sent to the winner.
  • You will be asked to electronically submit your manuscript to the ICHP KeePosted for publishing. This program will be accredited for CPE and will require that you complete material for ACPE accreditation.
  • You will receive a complimentary registration to the ICHP Annual Meeting, recognition at the meeting and a monetary award distributed to your institution.
  • Non-winning submissions may also be considered for publication in the ICHP KeePosted, but your permission will be obtained beforehand.
Thank you to PharMEDium for providing a grant for the 2017 Best Practice Award!





Professional Affairs
American Heart Association Heart Walks



For many of us, heart disease and stroke hit much closer to home than you may realize and we encounter it daily in our practice. This year, ICHP has committed to participating in the American Heart Association's Heart Walks in Illinois and St. Louis, Missouri. Because heart disease is the number one killer of all Americans, and affects the lives of so many of our lives, we have made this initiative a priority.

To reach our fundraising goals, we are encouraging all members to participate in our fundraising efforts. You have many options for participation, such as:

  • Serving as a Local Team Leader (minor logistical responsibilities on the day of the event).
  • Joining a Team as a fundraising walker (walkers who raise $100 or more will receive a special AHA Heart Walk shirt and are eligible for prizes).
  • Making a personal donation to the ICHP team page even if unable to walk.

We seek motivated and dedicated members to serve as the Local Team Leader for each of the walks listed below. ICHP needs walkers who will not only walk and contribute themselves but also ask friends and family to donate to help us reach our goal in assisting the American Heart Association in fighting heart disease and stroke. If you would like to participate as a Walker to help raise funds, please go online here and register for the walk of your choice below. If you would like to participate as a Local Team Leader, please contact Tamkeen Quraishi Abreu (tquraishiabreu@gmail.com) from the Community Service Subcommittee. 

Join us at these upcoming Heart Walks!

June 16, 2017 - Rockford, IL (join us or make a donation)  http://www2.heart.org/site/TR?fr_id=2140&pg=team&team_id=188249

September 24, 2017 - Chicago, IL (join us or make a donation)  http://www2.heart.org/site/TR?fr_id=2454&pg=team&team_id=188250

October 7, 2017 - Carterville, IL (join us or make a donation)  http://www2.heart.org/site/TR?fr_id=2453&pg=team&team_id=188255

Sincerely,

 
ICHP Professional Affairs Division 
Illinois Council of Health-System Pharmacists (ICHP)


ICHPeople


Congratulations to ICHP member, Sheila Allen, for receiving the UIC COP Golden Apple Award!


Some of our members are shown here representing ICHP at ASHP's Summer Meeting! Visit our Facebook Page to see more!






College Connection

Midwestern University, Chicago College of Pharmacy
A Mentor in the Making: An Interview with Taylor Gutwald

College Connection

by Lisa Nguyen, PS-3, ICHP Historian

About two years ago, was the birth of ICHP-MWU’s Mentorship Program. Its mission is to offer the opportunity for guidance and support to each first-year pharmacy student through the shared experiences and wisdom of either a PS-2 or a PS-3. As many of us know, the transition into pharmacy school can be overwhelming and difficult - not just the course load but also the social aspect and eagerness to be involved. With the Mentorship Program, the PS-1s are given something that pharmacy programs do not naturally entail - a relationship with a peer that focuses on supporting the development and transition of the mentee. This holds incredible value for long-term self-development and creating professional relationships. Since the program is new and has grown tremendously over the past two years, I have interviewed a Co-Chair of the Mentorship Committee, Ms. Taylor Gutwald, to shine some light on the program and its evolution.

Gutwald, originally from Michigan, is currently a PS-3. She tells us why she got involved with ICHP and what inspired her to do more. She joined ICHP during her first year, volunteered as a mentor during her second year, and was voted Co-Chair of the Mentorship Committee during her third year. Gutwald recalls being lost and overwhelmed when first starting pharmacy school due to the change in course load, losing her support system, and the pressure to do well while making new friends. Gutwald says, “At first it was super exciting to start at a new school, meet new people, and of course learn, with the focus on pharmaceutics. But meanwhile I’m thinking to myself, ‘how do I get involved and how much should I do? [what about] my grades?...should I continue to do research?’ And overall I was just overwhelmed with the amount of information thrown at me. I like being involved and thoroughly enjoy helping others, which is why I became a mentor and eventually ended up on the Mentorship Committee.”

Taylor oversaw the matching process, created requirements hours, and generated ideas for all sorts of activities to strengthen quality interactions. Comparing the previous year to this year, there were about 100 participants versus 50. Gutwald states that creating activities and finding the physical space to host 100+ students was sometimes a bit of a challenge but was all worthwhile. They offered more activities that include socials, games, and events to allow the mentors/mentees a chance to be more active and get to know one another on a personal level.

This type of duty - to support and help our cohorts - requires a special kind of passion. It was tough for Gutwald as coursework became harder, she started rotations, and when her other obligations became more demanding. However, she says she would do it all over again without hesitation. Gutwald highlights that she gained leadership experience in a very unique way - by creating valuable opportunities for other students. The Mentorship Program gives something that is experienced and shared and it fosters a one-of-a-kind relationship. Gutwald says that she has grown and learned so much since the start of pharmacy school and believes that the principles of working together to help give back to others will follow her not only in her pharmacy career but throughout her whole life. The ICHP-MWU Mentorship Program bestows an invaluable offering that everyone should take advantage of.


Roosevelt University College of Pharmacy
Recent Events at Roosevelt University College of Pharmacy

College Connection

by Rameez Hasan, PS-3 Membership Chair, Samana Walji, PS-3 Social Services Chair

Recently, our chapter hosted our spring Journal Club for our P2 and P3 class. To our surprise, more of the P2 class participated this year compared to previously. This may have been because the newer class is starting to be introduced to the more clinical side of pharmacy. Normally, our journal clubs are under the supervision of our advisor, whose clinical input is of the most value when analyzing clinical trials. For our most recent journal club, we invited one of our other professors, a medical chemist by training. In his previous years, he was employed by a pharmaceutical company and contributed in the research department. This was a great experience for us as we were able to get feedback not only from a clinical perspective, but through a chemical perspective as well. He challenged us to not only understand the trial that was being discussed, but to understand the background and the pharmacokinetics of the medications being discussed as well. We were truly fortunate to have him join our discussion and hope to have other faculty and professors participate and provide their input as well.

Our SSHP chapter has a few upcoming events next month. As part of volunteer outreach, our SSHP chapter will be hosting a volunteer event next month. We will be spending our Saturday at a local food pantry, Trinity Food Pantry, in Schaumburg, Illinois. We will be helping with stocking of the pantry as well as helping the volunteers distribute food to people visiting the pantry. Our chapter has always been interested in sponsoring a volunteer event, and we plan to continue hosting semiannual volunteering events.

Another upcoming event is our annual CV workshop. This event is intended for all students, however it is especially geared towards the P2 class, who will have an opportunity to participate in this event for the first time. The CV workshop gives our students an opportunity to learn how to construct a polished CV. Students will also have the opportunity to receive feedback on their own CVs and learn the important parts of a CV. The workshop will be conducted by a P4 SSHP member who accepted a residency in managed care. Having recent experience applying for residencies, she will provide students with relevant and up-to-date tips. The CV workshop is one of the events SSHP holds to help students develop their professional skills and prepare them to be successful after graduation. 


Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Sciences
ASHP Student Advocacy

College Connection

by Anna Gracheva, P3, Vice President

ASHP’s Student Advocacy Training and Legislative Day is a two-day conference for student pharmacists, held every March, in Bethesda, Maryland. The purpose of this conference is to educate student pharmacists on how to become advocates for both patients and our profession. When I first found out that I was selected to attend, I was overcome with joy and excitement to learn more about the conference. This was the first time I had heard about it, and I was looking forward to meeting and working with other student pharmacists from around the country. The current president of the Rosalind Franklin University-ICHP chapter and I were the only pharmacy students from the State of Illinois in attendance this year. With this article, I hope to build awareness and encourage Illinois pharmacy students to attend this event every year.

On the first day of the conference, we discussed the political impact of provider status. ASHP staff members explained how we are the only health care profession that is not considered a provider in the Social Security Act. The Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas Enhancement Act (H.R. 592/S. 109) will allow pharmacists to be considered as providers in the Social Security Act. The bill will allow pharmacists to deliver care in underserved communities. This is the first step in achieving access for a broader provider status in any setting. In addition, there was an in depth review of the legislative process, including how laws and regulations are introduced and passed by the US Congress.

The following day we converged on Capitol Hill to speak to different US Senators and Representatives. It was a really empowering feeling knowing that we can educate Congressmen and women on issues they may not be very familiar with. When the whole group reconvened to speak about their experiences, some stated that the congressional staff members with whom they spoke with were unfamiliar about the bill. This shows how just a few student pharmacists can advocate for our profession, and help to educate lawmakers.

On the second day, we had the opportunity to meet with the only pharmacist who is a US Representative, Buddy Carter (R-GA). It was great to learn about his career path and how it led him to Capitol Hill. The knowledge that we took away from this meeting allowed us to be better prepared for the IL Legislative Day in Springfield where we had the opportunity to meet with our State Senators and Representatives at the state level.

During the two-day session, there was a lot of opportunity to network with other students as well. Pharmacy is a small world and taking advantage of networking opportunities can help us in the future. I was outside of my comfort zone, but this ended up being a very fun and rewarding experience. I learned more about an aspect of pharmacy I wasn’t as familiar with and I met other pharmacy students who I look forward to seeing again at other national pharmacy meetings. It was really great to see how much impact we can make just during one meeting. I would encourage students from other colleges to reach out to their faculty advisors and college administration to request support to attend this very important training.


More

Upcoming Events


Visit the ICHP Calendar for the most up-to-date events!                 Visit the ICHP Calendar for the most up-to-date events!

Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 12:00 PM
Cultivating Safety in the Pharmacy
Adam Bursua, Pharm.D., BCPS
Champions LIVE Webinar for Pharmacy Technicians

Accredited for pharmacy technicians and pharmacists | 0.5 contact hour (0.05 CEU
)


Saturday, June 24, 2017 | 8:00am
Pharmacy-Based Immunization Delivery
Springfield, IL

Miranda Wilhelm, PharmD
Garth K. Reynolds, RPh

IPhA Program
Use Code: ICHP17

Accredited for pharmacists | 20.0 contact hours (2.0 CEUs)


Saturday, July 1, 2017
2017 Best Practice Award Submissions Due

More information on the 2017 Best Practice Award and Program coming soon.


Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - 12:00 PM
Mother to Baby: Brief Overview of Medication Use During Pregnancy
Brooke L. Griffin, Pharm.D., BCACP
Champions LIVE Webinar

Accredited for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians |0.5 contact hour (0.05 CEU
)


Tuesday, August 8, 2017 - Save the Date
Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis
Cassandra Collins, PharmD
Sangamiss LIVE Program

Accredited for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians |1.0 contact hour (0.10 CEU
)

Save the date! Watch for more information in upcoming news briefs.



September 14-16, 2017
ICHP Annual Meeting
Drury Lane Theatre and Conference Center
Oakbrook Terrace, IL


Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 12:00 PM
Streamlining the Crash Cart Model: Less is More
Elizabeth Short, PharmD, BCCCP
Champions LIVE Webinar

Accredited for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians |0.5 contact hour (0.05 CEU
)


 



Officers and Board of Directors

CHARLENE HOPE 
President
708-783-5933 
chope@macneal.com

JENNIFER PHILLIPS 
Immediate Past President
630-515-7167 
jphillips@midwestern.edu

TRAVIS HUNERDOSSE 
President-elect
THUNERDO@nm.org 

MIKE WEAVER 
Treasurer 
815-599-6113 
mweaver@fhn.org

JENNIFER ARNOLDI 
Secretary 
jearnol@gmail.com

LARA ELLINGER 
Director, Educational Affairs 
laelling@nm.org

CARRIE VOGLER
Director, Marketing Affairs
217-545-5394

KRISTI STICE 
Director, Professional Affairs
217-544-6464 ext.44660 
kristi.stice@hshs.org

CAROL HEUNISCH 
Director, Organizational Affairs 
847-933-6811

KATHRYN SCHULTZ
Director, Government Affairs
312-926-6961

DAVID TJHIO 
Chairman, Committee on Technology 
816-885-4649 
david.tjhio@bd.com

COLLEEN BOHNENKAMP
Chairman, New Practitioners Network

BRYAN MCCARTHY
Co-Chairman, Ambulatory Care Network

VIRGINIA NASH
Co-Chairman, Ambulatory Care Network

CLARA GARY
Technician Representative

JACOB GETTIG 
Editor & Chairman, KeePosted Committee 
630-515-7324 fax: 630-515-6958 
jgetti@midwestern.edu 

JENNIFER PHILLIPS 
Assistant Editor, KeePosted 
630-515-7167 
jphillips@midwestern.edu 

SCOTT MEYERS 
Executive Vice President, ICHP Office 
815-227-9292 
scottm@ichpnet.org 


Regional Directors

NOELLE CHAPMAN 
Regional Director North
312-926-2547
nchapman@nmh.org 

ED RAINVILLE 
Regional Director Central 
ed.c.rainville@osfhealthcare.org 

LYNN FROMM 
Regional Co-Director South
618-391-5539

TARA VICKERY GORDEN 
Regional Co-Director South
618-643-2361 x2330


Student Chapter Presidents

FLORENCE PATINO 
President, Student Chapter 
Chicago State University C.O.P. 

SHAZIYA BARKAT 
President, Student Chapter
Midwestern University Chicago C.O.P. 
sbarkat14@midwestern.edu

KASIA PLIS 
President, Student Chapter 
Roosevelt University C.O.P. 
kplis@mail.roosevelt.edu

JORIE KREITMAN 
President, Student Chapter 
Rosalind Franklin University C.O.P. 
jorie.kreitman@my.rfums.org

MALLORY BELCHER 
President, Student Chapter 
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville S.O.P
mabelch@siue.edu

LEVI PILONES 
President, Chicago Student Chapter
University of IL C.O.P. 
lpilon2@uic.edu 

TREVOR LUMAN 
President, Rockford Student Chapter 
University of IL C.O.P. 
tluman2@uic.edu


ICHP Affiliates 


ANTOINE JENKINS 
President, Northern IL Society (NISHP)

JARED SHELEY 
President, Metro East Society (MESHP)
jpsheley@gmail.com 

KATELYN CONKLEN 
President, Sangamiss Society
Conklen.Katelyn@mhsil.com

ED RAINVILLE
 
President, West Central Society (WSHP)  
ed.c.rainville@osfhealthcare.org

Vacant Roles at Affiliates — 
President, Rock Valley Society; Southern IL Society; Sugar Creek Society

ICHP Pharmacy Action Fund (PAC) Contributors

Names below reflect donations between June 1, 2016 and June 1, 2017. Giving categories reflect each person's cumulative donations since inception.     

ADVOCACY ALLIANCE - $2500-$10000
Kevin Colgan
Edward Donnelly
James Owen Consulting Inc.
Frank Kokaisl
Scott Meyers
Michael Novario
Michael Weaver
Thomas Westerkamp


LINCOLN LEAGUE - $1000-$2499
Scott Bergman
Andrew Donnelly
Ann Jankiewicz
Jan Keresztes
Kathy Komperda
William McEvoy
Michael Rajski
Christina Rivers-Quillian
Michael Short
Carrie Sincak
Avery Spunt
Patricia Wegner


CAPITOL CLUB - $500-$999
Sheila Allen
Margaret Allen
Rauf Dalal 
Drury Lane Theater
Travis Hunerdosse
Leonard Kosiba
Mary Lee
Janette Mark
Jennifer Phillips
Edward Rainville
Kathryn Schultz
Heidi Sunday
Jill Warszalek
Alan Weinstein


GENERAL ASSEMBLY GUILD - $250-$499
Tom Allen
Peggy Bickham
Jaime Borkowski
Donna Clay
Scott Drabant
Sandra Durley
Michael Fotis
Joann Haley
Joan Hardman
Kim Janicek
Zahra Khudeira
Ann Kuchta
Ronald Miller
Peggy Reed
Tara Vickery-Gorden
Carrie Vogler
Marie Williams


SPRINGFIELD SOCIETY - $100-$249
Rebecca Castner
Noelle Chapman
Lara Ellinger
Jennifer Ellison
Nora Flint
Glenna Hargreaves
Carol Heunisch
Lois Honan
Charlene Hope
Robert Hoy
Richard Kruzynski
Kati Kwasiborski
Bella Maningat
Milena McLaughlin
Megan Metzke
Kenneth Miller
Danielle Rahman
Amanda Wolff

GRASSROOTS GANG - $50-$99
Antoinette Cintron
Jeanne Durley
Linda Grider
Heather Harper
Erika Hellenbart
Ina Henderson
Leslie Junkins
Connie Larson
Barbara Limburg-Mancini
John McBride
Kit Moy
Gary Peksa
Daphne Smith-Marsh
Jennifer Splawski
Thomas Yu


CONTRIBUTOR - $1-$49
Marc Abel
Tamkeen Abreu
Gabriel Ahiamadi
Trisha Blassage
Coleen Bohnenkamp
Erick Borckowski
Josh DeMott
Janina Dionnio
Angelia Dreher
Tim Dunphy
Veronica Flores
Frank Hughes
Lori Huske
Vera Kalin
David Martin
Claudia Muldoon
Jose Ortiz
Lupe Paulino
Amanda Penland
Zach Rosenfeldt
Kevin Rynn
Cheryl Scantlen
Joellyn Schefke
Amanda Seddon
Kushal Shah
Beth Shields
"Southern Il University Edwardsville"
Karen Trenkler
University Of IL COP
Kathryn Wdowiarz
Marcella Wheatley
Tom Wheeler


Welcome New Members!

New Member Recruiter
Arturo Aguirre
Vincent Chau
Shayna Cruz Katarzyna Plis
Nich Neeley
Peter Sullivan Ann Jankiewicz


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